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Which conditions show reduced costs with disease management?

Date:
February 6, 2015
Source:
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Summary:
Asthma, back pain, and congestive heart failure are among the conditions showing reductions in health care costs in one large employer’s disease management (DM) program, reports a study.

Asthma, back pain, and congestive heart failure are among the conditions showing reductions in health care costs in one large employer’s disease management (DM) program, reports a study in the February Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, official publication of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM).

Eric Jutkowitz, BA, and colleagues evaluated the cost impact of a DM program for University of Minnesota employees and dependents. Disease management programs use various approaches to improve management of common, high-cost chronic diseases.

Over a six-year period, the DM program led to significant cost reductions for most targeted conditions. Health care spending was decreased for patients with asthma, cardiovascular disease, congestive heart failure, depression, musculoskeletal disorders, low back pain, and migraine headaches.

The DM approach reduced hospitalizations for these same conditions, except congestive heart failure. It specially reduced “avoidable” hospitalizations for asthma, depression, and low back pain.

The DM program did not reduce costs for patients with diabetes, arthritis, or osteoporosis. There was no effect on work absences for any of the targeted conditions.

Employers are interested in DM approaches to help control the high health and productivity costs of chronic diseases. However, because of differences between programs, it is difficult to evaluate their effectiveness for different conditions. The University of Minnesota DM program relies largely on disease-specific telephone coaching.

The new study suggests that this DM approach can reduce costs and hospitalization rates for patients with several common and costly conditions, but not others — notably including diabetes. The researchers note that studies of other DM programs have reported reductions in diabetes costs.

“Employers should focus on those conditions that generate savings when purchasing DM programs,” Jutkowitz and colleagues write. They believe their DM approach succeeded in lowering costs in part by reducing “management breakdowns” that lead to avoidable hospitalizations.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of Occupational and Environmental MedicineNote: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Eric Jutkowitz, John A. Nyman, Tzeyu L. Michaud, Jean M. Abraham, Bryan Dowd. For What Illnesses Is a Disease Management Program Most Effective? Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 2015; 57 (2): 117 DOI: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000000385

SOURCE

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Josh Sandberg

Josh Sandberg is the President and CEO of Ortho Spine Partners and sits on several company and industry related Boards. He also is the Creator and Editor of OrthoSpineNews.

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