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Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital achieves Magnet recognition for second time, reflecting excellence in patient care and service

Woodruff Health Sciences Center | Aug. 26, 2021

ATLANTA – Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital has achieved Magnet recognition for the second time in a row as a testament to its continued dedication to high-quality nursing practice. The American Nurses Credentialing Center’s (ANCC) Magnet Recognition Program® distinguishes health care organizations that meet rigorous standards for nursing excellence. This credential is the highest national honor for professional nursing practice.

With this redesignation, patients will continue to experience exceptional nursing care coordination and a commitment to quality and patient safety during their hospital stay.

In 2016, Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital received its first Magnet designation as a reflection of its nursing professionalism, leadership, teamwork and superiority in patient care. Only 562 U.S. health care organizations out of more than 6,300 U.S. hospitals have achieved Magnet recognition.

“Magnet recognition is a tremendous honor and highlights our commitment to delivering the highest quality of care to our patients and their families,” says April Mount, MSN, RN-BC, NEA-BC, vice president of patient care and chief nursing officer at Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital. “Earning Magnet recognition once was a great accomplishment, and earning the achievement for a second time reflects our continued dedication to nursing excellence.”

Upon learning of the redesignation during a call from the ANCC, the hospital was commended in seven areas of excellence, including: patient experience, care coordination, patient education, careful listening by the nurse and excellence in preventing hospital acquired pressure injuries and infections.

“While this Magnet recognition focuses on the successes of our nurses, it also demonstrates the commitment of our entire team and the importance of collaboration and best practice across disciplines when caring for our patients,” says Matt Wain, CEO, Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital, Emory University Hospital and Emory University Hospital at Wesley Woods. “Thank you to all of the clinicians and staff who helped make this redesignation successful.”

In June 2021, in preparation for Magnet redesignation, ANCC appraisers conducted a virtual site visit over two-and-a-half-days, meeting with more than 100 staff members, including nurses and interprofessional colleagues. Appraisers virtually visited all hospital units where nurses practice and verified on-site the teamwork between disciplines and quality outcomes.

“We are so proud of the care teams at Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital for completing this next step in our Magnet journey as a health system,” says Sharon Pappas, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN chief nurse executive for Emory Healthcare. “Magnet recognition inspires nurses to be the best they can be every day for our patients and our community.

Magnet recognition has been shown to provide specific benefits to health care organization and their communities, such as:

  • Higher patient satisfaction
  • Lower mortality rates
  • Higher job satisfaction among nurses
  • Lower nurse reports of intentions to leave their positions 

Emory Healthcare has four Magnet-designated hospitals: Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital, Emory University Hospital, Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital and Emory Johns Creek Hospital. A hospital’s Magnet designation lasts for four years, then hospitals must reapply for designation.

Because Magnet recognition is the gold standard for nursing excellence, it is a factor when health care organizations are ranked nationally for their clinical programs and expertise. U.S. News & World Report’s annual showcase of “U.S. News Best Hospitals” includes Magnet recognition in its ranking criteria for quality of inpatient care.

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Chris J. Stewart

Chris currently serves as President and CEO of Surgio Health. Chris has close to 20 years of healthcare management experience, with an infinity to improve healthcare delivery through the development and implementation of innovative solutions that result in improved efficiencies, reduction of unnecessary financial & clinical variation, and help achieve better patient outcomes. Previously, Chris was assistant vice president and business unit leader for HPG/HCA. He has presented at numerous healthcare forums on topics that include disruptive innovation, physician engagement, shifting reimbursement models, cost per clinical episode and the future of supply chain delivery.

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